Albany, Alexander Stewart, 3rd Duke


Alexander Stewart was the second son of James II of Scotland. He was the 3rd Duke of Albany and Earl of March. Albany fell out with his elder brother, James III, and was cast into prison in 1479. He managed to escape and made his way to France. There he gained English support for his claim to become King of Scotland (the English were never shy about meddling in Scottish affairs to their benefit!)

Albany raised an army with the aid of the Earl of Douglas, and invaded Scotland in 1482, calling himself Alexander IV. Albany was aided by an English army under Richard, Duke of Gloucester, the future Richard III. The English sacked Berwick, following which the king's forces rebelled and killed the ryal favourites. James III was a virtual prisoner and Albany looked to be on the verge of victory. However, he and his supporters quarelled, and Albany freed James and reached an uneasy harmony with his brother.

However, that harmony was shortlived, and once again Albany fled to France. He invaded for a second time in 1484, again with English support, but this attempt ended in defeat at the Battle of Lochmaben, and he was forced to flee back to France, never to return. Shortly after his return to France, Albany was killed in a tournament. His son later returned to Scotland as regent for the infant James V.

Time period(s): Medieval

Tags: Duke of Albany   Earl of March   Albany   James II   James III   Treaty of Fotheringhay  

Prehistory - Roman Britain - Dark Ages - Medieval Britain - The Tudor Era - The Stuarts - Georgian Britain - The Victorian Age

History of England - History of Wales - London History

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