Pierowall Church
Pierowall Church
A ruined and roofless medieval church looking out to sea. The major historic interest here are a small collection of finely carved medieval tombstones. The church, also known as Lady Kirk, was built in the 13th century, but much of what we can see today is the result of rebuilding in the 17th century.
The simple layout consists of a rectagular nave and chancel angled slightly off-centre towards the south. The church is built of rubble with freestone dressing, and the nave is 14.5 metres long and just over 6 metres wide. The oldest stonework is set in clay, while the newer work uses lime mortar. The church was in use as the parish church of Pierowall until sometime after 1879.

A pair of beautifully carved tombstones are set into the walls of the chancel, protected by glass frames, and there are further interesting 18th century grave slabs in the graveyard.

It seems likely that Pierowall church is built on the site of an older building, as the Orkneyinga saga tells us that the Norse chief Rognvald visited the church before launching his campaign to conquer Orkney in 1136.