Hentland, St Dubricius Church
Hentland, St Dubricius Church
The church of St Dubricius at Hentland dates to the middle of the 11th century, though the bulk of the current building dates to the 13th and 14th centuries. It is entirely possible that there was a church here well before the Norman conquest; indeed, the name of the village comes from the Welsh words for 'old church'.

The dedication to St Dubricius (or Dyfrig in Welsh) suggests that there was a link between Hentland church and the 5th or 6th-century monastery that Dyfrig founded at Llanfrother. There are several interesting historical furnishings, including a carved Jacobean chair and pulpit and a 17th-century parish chest that still has its original locking mechanism. There is a ring of four bells, with one being medieval and the other three dating to 1628.

The other interior feature of note is the octagonal font, which is 15th or 16th century. The poppyhead decoration on the choir stalls is 16th-century work. The rood screen is Victorian, but it incorporates bits of a 15th-century screen. In the churchyard stands a badly worn 14th-century cross, unusually still standing in its original position despite efforts to damage it by Puritan sympathizers in the 17th century.

One ancient custom associated with Hentland should be mentioned; according to a bequest by Lady Lucas Scudamore in 1570, cakes (small buns) and cider is given to the poor of the parish each year on Palm Sunday. This bequest, known as Pax Cakes, is made available to those who live in the parishes of Hentland, Kings Caple, and Sellack, and handed out as they leave the church after service.