Dryslwyn Castle
Dryslwyn Castle
Built sometime before 1250 by an unknown Welsh lord, on a steep, isolated hill overlooking the Tyfi plain. The castle was expanded twice before 1287, when it was attacked by the English under Edward I. Edward's men only managed to take Dryslwyn after a long a desparate siege, and then only after 150 men died when the tunnels they were building to undermine the castle collapsed on them.
The first fortification consisted of a round tower and a domestic range within a walled court. In the late 13th century a pair of walled courts were added between the tower and the walled borough. The best surviving remain is the outer face of the domestic range.

There was originally a walled borough on the lower summit of the hill, but nothing of this now remains. Only the scant remains of a hall and keep walls survive to give some notion of the original layout. The castle was extended and partially rebuilt in the 14th century, but early in the 15th century it was slighted and fell out of use.