Hay Castle
Hay Castle
Norman castle ruins composed of walls, gateway, and tower, built about 1200. Part of the ruins contain a bookstore. The castle was supposedly owned by Maud, wife of William de Braose. The first fortification at Hay was on a motte beside the parish church.
The first stone fortification was probably the work of William de Braose (see Abergavenny). King John captured Hay Castle in 1207 and took Maud prisoner. She died in captivity, possibly from starvation. De Braose rebelled in 1216 and John burned both the town and castle.

Llewelyn the Great sacked the castle in 1231. It was captured by Simon de Montfort in the Barons War of 1264, then retaken the following year by Prince Edward (later Edward I). The castle was attacked once again in Owain Glyndwr's rising of 1405, but this time it resisted capture. It served as residence for the Dukes of Buckingham until the lasrt dake faced the executioner's blade in 1521. The castle was left to moulder away, gradually decaying into the crumbling ruins we see today.

It is hard to eulogise about Hay Castle, for the most part of the ruins were in a sad state of disrepair when I last visited. The castle was obviously an imposing and impressive building at one time, but now the walls crumble and some parts are closed to visitors for safety's sake.