Halton, St Wilfrid's Church
Halton, St Wilfrid's Church
The parish church at Halton daes back to at least 1190. Much of the current building is the result of a heavy rebuilding in the Victorian period, however. There is a late 16th century tower, but the main historic interest at Halton is provided by a Viking cross in the churchyard. The Halton cross stands some 4.5 metres high, and probably dates to the 10th or 11th century.
What is fascinating about the Halton cross is that it is carved with both Christian and Viking symbols, the latter illustrating the story of Sigurd and his combat with the dragon Fafnir. The top of the cross was removed in the 16th century, and the shaft was used as a sundial. In the late Victorian period a new top was added in rough approximation of the original.

A pair of early grave slabs are set into the wall of the porch, and there are further fragments of Saxon crosses under the tower. There is also a very fine mausoleum to the Bradshaw family, built in classical style around 1775. Near the church is the remain of an 11th century Norman motte and bailey fortification.