Dylan Thomas Boat House
Dylan Thomas Boat House
Access to the small home where Dylan Thomas, the famous Welsh poet, lived for the last 4 years of his life, is along a footpath and down a steep staircase. The sitting room has been furnished as it would have been when the Thomas family lied here. Two upstairs rooms house a collection of Thomas writings, and memorabilia connected with the author.
Perhaps the strangest item on display is a death mask made shortly after Thomas died in New York in 1953. There is a small shop, and a tea room, and that's really all! Its a very small house, and it won't take long to see all there is to see, even for the most enthusiastic Dylan Thomas fan, but the locatiom overloooking the shore is wonderful.

The origins of the house are a bit of a mystery; no records exist prior to 1834, and rumour has it that the house was used by smugglers. The rumours are leant some credence by the existence of a secret passage leading from the shore to a path near the door. It was used as a residence and rented as a holiday home, but in 1949 Dylan Thomas brought his family here, and it was from here that he wrote some of his most enduring works, including 'Do Not Go Gentle', and 'Under Milk Wood', which was said to be inspired by the locals of Laugharne.

The Boat House can be accesssed by a path along the shore at low tide, which takes you to Laugharne Castle and the main visitor car park. Atop the cliffs, up a staircase from the house, is the Garage, or Writing Shed, where Thomas did most of his writing. This simple structure cannot be entered, but there is a glass door so you can see into the interior, which has been furnished as it would have been when Thomas used it - down to wadded bits of paper thrown on the floor.

The Boat House is well signposted from the main Laugharne car park and in several places around the town. On the outskirts of Laugharne is St Mary's church, where you can find the simple white cross marking the burial place of Thomas and his wife Caitlin.