The old mill at Killin
The old mill at Killin
The northern gateway to the Trossachs, Killin is a popular visitor destination in its own right. It is easy to see why; this pretty village is situated astride the River Dochart at the western tip of Loch Tay, and the Falls of Dochart run through the centre of the village. On a island in the middle of the river is the ancient burial ground of Clan MacNab, surely one of the most besautifully situated burial grounds in Scotland.

Indeed, so highly did the MacNabs prize it that one clan chief famously wooed his intended bride by telling her that if she were to marry him, she could be buried here. The exterior of the site can be viewed from the bridge, ansd keys to enter the burial ground can be obtained from the Breadalbane Folklore Centre (see below).

Paths lead from the road down onto the rocks of the Falls. The going is not difficult, but beware if the river is in spate!

On the north west bank of the river is an old mill, with a working millwheel. The mill houses the local history museum and Breadalbane Folklore Centre, with a special display on St. Fillan. The saint was a 7th century monk who was said to have founded the original mill on this very spot. See Fillan's legendary healing stones.

The Falls of Dochart at Killin
The Falls of Dochart at Killin
At the north end of the high street, is the playing field. A short path behind the field leads a solitary standing stone. This is known as Fingall's Grave Stone, said to mark the burial place of the legendary Celtic giant Fingall.

On the outskirts of Killin a bridge leads across the river to the grim ruins of Finlarig Castle, the stronghold of Sir Duncan Campbell, the infamous 'Black Duncan'. The castle dates to the 11th century, but was rebuilt by Campbell in the 16th century. Over the door are the coat of arms of James I and Queen Anne, a sign of the royal approval the Campbells enjoyed.

At the foot of the castle is a rectangular pit, looking like an oversized grave. The analogy is apt, for this is the Beheading Pit. Legend tells that it was here that the Campbell lairds of Finlarig watched from the castle windows as their victims were executed as after-dinner entertainment. The castle is situated on private ground, and there are posted signs warning that the ruins amay be unsafe, so be warned!

Nearby:
Balquhidder and Rob Roy's Grave