Freemasons' Hall
Freemasons' Hall
This grand structure in art deco style, covering over 2 acres, was built between 1927 and 1933 by HV Ashley and F. Winton Newman to act as the British headquarters of United Grand Lodge of England (the Masons). It was originally called the Masonic Peace Memorial, in honour of Masons who perished in WWI. The name was changed to Freemason's Hall when the Second World War broke out.
Freemason's Hall is the third mason's hall on the site. The first was built in 1775 in the area now occupied by the Connaught Rooms. It served as a combination tavern, meeting rooms, and theatre for the performing arts. This was replaced by a second masonic hall which was completed in 1869. This second Freemason's Hall eventually became unsafe due to fire damage in 1883, and much of it was pulled down to make way for the current building.

Within Freemason's Hall is Memorial Shrine, a memorial to the 3225 masons who perished in WWI. Central to this memorial is a gilt casket designed by Walter Gilbert, who also design the Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace.

At the core of the building is the Grand Temple, approached through massive bronze doors weighing over 1 ton each. The Temple chamber is often used for concerts and performances.