Jewry Wall, Leicester
Jewry Wall, Leicester
A section of wall from a Roman bath house, standing in the middle of modern Leicester, a few blocks from the cathedral. The wall is over 30 feet high, and the foundation walls of the bath house can be seen at the foot of the wall. Immediately besie the Wall is a museum of Leicester area archaeology.
The bath house and next door exercise hall were buil around 154 AD as part of the old Roman town of Ratae Coritanorum, the forerunner of Leicester. The bath house layout is clearly shown, with modern replica hypocaust (underfloor heating) columns showing what the original hypocaust would have looked like. The bath house consisted of three large calderia (hot baths) and three smaller tepidaria (warm baths).

After the Romans left the exercise hall was demolished to make way for a Saxon church, an ancestor of the medieval church of St Nicholas which stands beside the wall today. The Jewry Wall was incorporated into a succession of industrial and domestic buildings. In 1920 the site was cleared of modern buildings, leaving the Jewry Wall standing on its own.