Morcott, St Mary's Church
Morcott, St Mary's Church
The church of St Mary at Morcott dates to the the early Norman period. This Norman work was rebuilt in the early 14th century, with more Victorian restoration completing the picture. The tower features an unusual round 'pancake window' piercing the belfry enclosure. The window looks something like a sun-disc symbol.
There is a fascinating carving on the chancel arch, depicting a pair of serpents swallowing each other's tails. The arcade columns are superbly carved, with a wonderful variety of decorations adorning the capitals. There are human faces, geometric patterns, chevrons, a ram's head, a grotesque beast, and another intricate serpent design.

The nave retains its Norman character and there is a fine old Jacobean pulpit. In the south aisle is the altar tomb of William de Overtoun (d. 1500). The Overtouns were lords of the manor for centuries, living at Morcott Hall, which was called Overtoun Hall until 1800.