Abernethy Round Tower
Abernethy Round Tower
An 11th century round tower, one of only two such towers known to exist in Scotland (the other is at Brechin). Such towers are common in Ireland, but rare in Britain. Abernethy Tower is 15 feet in diameter at the base, tapering towards the top some 72 feet above. The tower was built by the monks of nearby Abernethy monastery, and probably served multiple purposes, as a bell tower and a hiding place in times of trouble.
Abernethy Symbol Stone
At the foot of the tower is a Pictish symbol stone, carved with traditional Pictish designs. The stone predates the tower by about 400 years, dating to about the year 600 AD. The stone is carved wih symbols of a hammer and tuning fork anvil, and the traditional Pictish crescent and V-rod design.

Several skeletons were found during excavations on the site, suggesting that it was also used as a burial place by the monks. A medieval chain and iron collar set in the tower base suggest that it was used to hold prisoners at some point.

NB.
The Abernethy town website suggests that the tower was built in the early 9th century, considerably older than the Historic Scotland estimate of an 11th century date.

There are excellent views over the Firth of Tay from the top of the tower, which can be reached by a modern spiral metal stair.

The Pictish symbol stone
The Pictish symbol stone
The tower entrance
The tower entrance
The view from atop the tower
The view from atop the tower