The Hurlers Stone Circles
The Hurlers Stone Circles
A series of three stone circles aligned in a row. This is the only known example of a stone circle linear grouping in England. The stone circles stand on flat ground below the rock formation known as The Cheesewring.
The stone circles probably date to the early Bronze Age. They are oriented on a roughly NNE by SSW axis. From end to end the alignment is 162 metres in length. The circle diameters from north to south measure 114 feet, 140 feet, and 108 feet. The large middle circle has 14 standing stones remaining out of an original number of 29 equally spaced stones. Many of the stones have been dressed, with flattened tops and flat inner sides. A granite slab stands at the centre of the circle.

It seems likely that the stone circles formed part of a processional route involving other local monuments, with which there are several known or suspected alignments.

The name of the circles come from a local legend that the stones were the remains of local men who were petrified for playing the game of hurling on the Sabbath. This is an open access site, easily accessed from the parking area at the south end of the village. It is also accessible from the parking at the north end of Minions, though with a longer walk. You can also walk from The Hurlers to the Cheesewring for wonderful views over the surrounding area.