Halliggye Fogou
Halliggye Fogou
An underground chamber believed to date from the 4th or 5th century BCE. The chamber was in use until sometime in the 2nd century AD. The fogou is located within an enclosing earthwork, possibly an Iron Age settlement.
The term 'fogou' is a Cornish word for cave, and is applied to Iron Age underground passages in Cornwall. The Halliggye Fogou is the largest and best-preserved fogou in Cornwall. No one knows for certain what purpose fogous served. Possible uses might include storage, ritual religious observance, and safety refuge.

The chambers are built of drystone walls and topped with large capstones. There is a straight chamber stretching 20 metres on a north-south axis. This is joined to a curving passage 28 metres long leading to a small chamber. Excavation in the Victorian period revealed a vase holding ashes, animal bones, and a pottery cup.