Cruggleton Church
Cruggleton Church
This quiet little 12th century church stands in a wooded copse set in the middle of a farm field like an oasis in a desert. The church dates to the period between 1125-1150, and is accounted the most complete Romanesque church in Galloway. Cruggleton was built by Fergus, the 1st Lord of Galloway, of nearby Cruggleton Castle, to serve as his private chapel.
The castle is little more than ruins today, and the church might have suffred the same fate if not for the efforts of the 3rd Marquess of Bute, who undertook the restoration of Cruggleton around 1890.

The church is quite simple, with a nave measuring 35' x 20'6" and a chancel roughly 21' x 15'. The nave and chancel are separated by a Romanesque arch, which is almost entirely original. Much of the north wall is also original Norman work.

The church is usually closed, but the key can be obtained from the nearby farmhouse, and there is an annual ecumenical service. You can also walk over the fields to the site of Cruggleton Castle, though in truth there is little of the castle remaining to see.