Soughton Hall
Soughton Hall
Sougton Hall was begun in 1714 for the powerful Wynne-Bankes family as a Bishop's Palace. The house was extended in 1732, then completely remodelled by William John Bankes in the 1820s.
Bankes was inspired by his experiences travelling in the Middle East, and created an exotic facade with Islamic elements mixed with more traditional British architecture. The architect responsible for implementing Banke's exotic vision was Charles Barry, later to become Sir Charles, and most famous for his design of the Houses of Parliament in London.

Close to the house is a formal 19th century garden, while further afield is 18th century parkland, traversed by a lime avenue planted by John Wynne around 1732. It is this lime avenue that provides the most historically important feature at Soughton, though the formal gardens near the Hall itself are lovely.

Since 1987 Soughton Hall has been operated as a country house hotel and wedding venue. This might normally mean that the interiors and the lovely gardens that surround the house would only be open to guests, however, the Hall does operate several popular restaurants, including one based in the old stable block, so perhaps enjoying a meal is the easiest way to enjoy Soughton today!