Norham Castle
Norham Castle
An imposing Norman castle built on the banks of the River Tweed around 1121 by Ranulf Flambard, the powerful Bishop of Durham. The castle stands on the site of a much earlier prehistoric fort. Over the centuries Norham was visited by monarchs of both England and Scotland on numerous occasions, including King John and Edward I of England, and William the Lion and John Balliol of Scotland.
Norham was the most powerful in the north, and as a result it suffered Scottish sieges on no less than 13 occasions. It withstood all except the last; in 1513 James IV battered Norham into submission with his artillery.

The most impressive part of Norham is the strong, square, central keep, restored in the 16th century. There are two wards; an outer ward which leads over a moated drawbridge to the inner ward. In the inner ward is the remains of a bishop's hall and the imposing keep, thought to have been built by Hugh de Puiset, Bishop of Durham in the late 12th century.