Crickhowell Castle
Crickhowell Castle
Originally a simple motte and bailey built by the De Turbervilles (see Coity Castle), Crickhowell was remodelled in stone in 1272 by the unlikely-named Sir Grimbald Pauncefote. He added a simple shell keep, little of which can be seen today. Still quite visible, however, are the twin-towered gatehouse and a double tower in the eastern end.
Sir Grimbald's great-grandson, Sir John Pauncefoot, was ordered by Henry IV to strengthen the castle against attack by Owain Glyndwr. but his efforts were in vain; as with so many Norman castles, Crickhowell was sacked by Glyndwr's men, who left it 'in ruins'.

The castle was granted to Sir William Herbert of Raglan, and through Herbert it eventually passed to the dukes of Beaufort. It was never rebuilt, however, and today is little more than an intriguing ruin.

Crickhowell is sometimes known as Ailsby's Castle, after a 13th century warder. The castle is set within a park in the centre of Crickhowell, a peaceful setting that seems at odds with the rather stark remains. The castle was sited above the River Usk on a major transportation route between Abergavenny and Brecon, a route followed by the Normans on their westward march into Wales.