Treaty of Aberconwy

1277

The Treaty of Aberconwy marked the capitulation (at least temporarily) of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales (Llewelyn the Last) to Edward I. According to the terms of the Treaty, Llewelyn had to pay a huge fine of £50,000, swear fealty to Edward at Rhuddlan, and travel to Edward's Christmas Court in London to repeat the oath of homage.

The Treaty of Aberconwy forced Llewelyn to cede his lands outside Gwynedd to the English monarch, yet still allowed him to retain the title Prince of Wales (a bit ironic, as Edward's other demands essentiually forced Llewelyn to surrender his authority outside his power base in Gwynedd.)

To really understand the Treaty of Aberconwy, you have to go back a decade to the Treaty of Montgomery (1267), by which Henry III agreed to recognise Llewelyn as Prince of Wales, and accepted that the title should descend to Llewelyn's heirs. According to the Treaty of Montgomery, all other Welsh rulers had to do homage to Llewelyn, while Llewelyn agreed to do homage to the English monarch in exchange for his support. Llewelyn contributed to his own downfall by refusing to do the homage to Henry or Edward, his heir. The concessions granted by the earlier treaty were effectively removed by the later Treaty of Aberconwy, and Llewelyn had to undergo the humiliation of swearing oaths of fealty to Edward.

Time period(s): Medieval

Tags: Treaty of Aberconwy   Edward I   Llewelyn ap Gruffudd   Llewelyn the Last  


History
Prehistory - Roman Britain - Dark Ages - Medieval Britain - The Tudor Era - The Stuarts - Georgian Britain - The Victorian Age

History of England - History of Wales - London History



Attraction search
in



National Trust

National Trust membership

National Trust membership

Free entry to National Trust properties throughout England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, plus discounted admission to National Trust for Scotand properties.

Membership details

About the National Trust


HISTORY CORNER

Name the Historic attraction

Name the mystery historic attraction
See larger image



British History Quiz

This revolutionary artist, architect, and landscape gardener helped develop the peculiarly English style of landscape gardening



 Clue

This Day in British History

08 December, 1542

Birth of Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary (d. 1582) was born to James V and Mary of Guise. Her father died only 6 days later and she was crowned at the age of nine months.

Monarch Mayhem

This king came to the throne aged only 9



 Clue

Passionate about British Heritage!