Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches

History and Architecture

Transept

The transverse arms of a church. Most churches were aligned east-west, with the chancel at the east end and a nave at the west. Larger churches augmented these two main sections with transerve sections on a north-south axis. Transepts could be short, little more than the depth of a small chapel, or as lengthy as a small church in itself! The point where transepts join the nave and chancel is known as the crossing.

Related: Chancel   Chapel   Crossing   Nave  

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