Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches

History and Architecture


A form of stonework common in the Saxon and early Norman periods, where alternating courses of stones are laid on opposing diagonal angles (for example, one course leans to the left, the next course leans to the right). The resulting stones were said to resemble fish bones, hence the name. Herringbone stonework is often found in the exterior walls of late Saxon churches.

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Mary, Queen of Scots was moved here following the failure of the Babington Plot to free her from captivity in 1586

23 March, 1743

First English performance of Handel's Messiah

During the performance at Covent Garden, George II started the tradition of standing for the 'Hallelujah Chorus'

This king was only nine months old when he became king

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