Alderman

The term 'Alderman' derives from the Old English 'ealdorman', designating an 'elder man', or member of local government (usually one exercising control over a shire). Throughout British history the term denoted a senior government member of a county council or city administration.

The office of alderman was abolished during ongoing government reforms of the 1970s, except for the City of London, where aldermen are still elected to represent London boroughs. The term can occasionally be granted as an honorary civic title.

Tags: alderman   London  

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