Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Chantry Definition

History and Architecture

Chantry

A Chantry, also known as a chantry chapel, is a memorial or even a complete building dedicated to the memory of a person or family. In the medieval period it was common for wealthy patrons of a church to give a grant of money to pay for a priest to say prayers for themselves and their family. The patron would erect a monument, and there the priest would say daily prayers for his or her soul. In large churches, chantries were entire side chapels accessed from the aisle, transepts, or ambulatory. Smaller chantries weee like glorified enclosed tombs, erected between the aisle and chancel or nave. Such chantries were often highly decorated and richly carved and painted, with finely vaulted ceilings in the later medieval period.

Related: Aisle   Ambulatory   Chancel   Chapel   Nave  




National Trust

National Trust membership

National Trust membership

Free entry to National Trust properties throughout England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, plus discounted admission to National Trust for Scotland properties.

Membership details

About the National Trust


HISTORY CORNER
Name the mystery historic attraction
See larger image



This writer, politician, and philosopher is best known for 'Novum Organum', and his 'Essays', published in 1597 and 1625



27 May, 1199

John I crowned at Westminster Abbey

John had already been anointed Duke of Normandy after the death of his brother, Richard I

This monarch was married to Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in 1923



Passionate about British Heritage!