Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Clerestory Definition

History and Architecture

Clerestory

An upper storey of a church, raised above the level of the aisles. The clerestory is often pierced with large windows, admitting welcome light into the nave. Many medieval churches were initially constructed without clerestories, but growing wealth and improved architectural techniques during the medieval period led to expansion upward, pushing the height of the nave up above the aisles, with the addition of a clerestory with windows. In some large churches the clerestory is topped with a third storey, called a triforium, often with blank arcading in place of windows.

Also sometimes spelled: clearstory

Related: Nave   Triforium  

Dalham, Suffolk

Dalham, Suffolk




English Heritage

English Heritage membership

English Heritage membership

Free entry to English Heritage properties throughout England, plus discounted admission to Historic Scotland and Cadw properties in Scotland and Wales.

Membership details

About English Heritage


HISTORY CORNER
Name the mystery historic attraction
See larger image



This famous architect designed the Crystal Palace for the Great Exhibition of 1851



25 April, 1284

Birth of Prince Edward (Edward II) at Caernarfon Castle

He was later named 'Prince of Wales', a title conferred on heirs to the English throne since

This king had 16 legitimate children



Passionate about British Heritage!