Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Lectern Definition

History and Architecture

Lectern

A reading desk, usually located to one side of the chancel arch, opposite or next to the pulpit. The Holy Bible is set on the lectern and passages read from it during services. Lecterns might be of stone or wood, but were often made of brass, commonly shaped like an eagle. One famous exception to the eagle motif is at Boynton, in the Yorkshire wolds, where the lectern is in the shape of a turkey, commemorating the story that a local resident brought the first turkey to Britain from Norh America.

Related: Arch   Chancel   Chancel Arch   Pulpit  




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This king of Wessex followed his father, Alfred the Great, to the throne



23 May, 1208

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