Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Ambulatory Definition

History and Architecture

Ambulatory

Literally a place for walking, an ambulatory is a covered passage. Such passages are found around the outside of monastic cloisters, but in church architecture the term usually refers to a walkway behind the high altar, linking it with chapels at the east end of the church and with aisles either side of the chancel. On the continent ambulatories were often apsidal (curved) in shape, while in England they were more commonly squared, with right-angle corners.

Related: Altar   Chancel  




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This famous landscape garden designer gained his odd nickname from his habit of telling clients that their estates had 'great capability of improvement'



01 December, 1135

Henry I dies after eating lampreys against doctor's orders

Henry's nephew Stephen rushes to England and is proclaimed king, even though Henry had named his daughter Matilda as his heir

He was killed by his stepmother to put his half-brother on the throne



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