Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Ambulatory Definition

History and Architecture

Ambulatory

Literally a place for walking, an ambulatory is a covered passage. Such passages are found around the outside of monastic cloisters, but in church architecture the term usually refers to a walkway behind the high altar, linking it with chapels at the east end of the church and with aisles either side of the chancel. On the continent ambulatories were often apsidal (curved) in shape, while in England they were more commonly squared, with right-angle corners.

Related: Altar   Chancel  

Attraction search
in



National Trust

National Trust membership

National Trust membership

Free entry to National Trust properties throughout England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, plus discounted admission to National Trust for Scotand properties.

Membership details

About the National Trust


HISTORY CORNER
Name the mystery historic attraction
See larger image



This legendary warrior supposedly led the British at the Battle of Mount Badon (c. 518)



18 October, 1529

Cardinal Wolsey falls from power

Henry blames Wolsey for failing to get papal blessing for annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. Wolsey tries to placate Henry by giving him York Place (Whitehall palace)

Shortly after this monarch was buried at Winchester Cathedral, the cathedral tower collapsed - a sign?



Passionate about British Heritage!