Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Herringbone Definition

History and Architecture

Herringbone

A form of stonework common in the Saxon and early Norman periods, where alternating courses of stones are laid on opposing diagonal angles (for example, one course leans to the left, the next course leans to the right). The resulting stones were said to resemble fish bones, hence the name. Herringbone stonework is often found in the exterior walls of late Saxon churches.

Attraction search
in



National Trust

National Trust membership

National Trust membership

Free entry to National Trust properties throughout England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, plus discounted admission to National Trust for Scotand properties.

Membership details

About the National Trust


HISTORY CORNER
Name the mystery historic attraction
See larger image



This monastery on the banks of the River Tyne was the home of scholar and author The Venerable Bede



12 December, 1889

Death of Robert Browning

Best known as a poet and playwright, Browning (b. 1812) was married to poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

How many wives did Henry VIII have?



Passionate about British Heritage!