Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Herringbone Definition

History and Architecture

Herringbone

A form of stonework common in the Saxon and early Norman periods, where alternating courses of stones are laid on opposing diagonal angles (for example, one course leans to the left, the next course leans to the right). The resulting stones were said to resemble fish bones, hence the name. Herringbone stonework is often found in the exterior walls of late Saxon churches.

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This war between England and Spain was ostensibly fought over Spanish mistreatment of an English sailor



18 October, 1529

Cardinal Wolsey falls from power

Henry blames Wolsey for failing to get papal blessing for annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. Wolsey tries to placate Henry by giving him York Place (Whitehall palace)

He was married to Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen



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