Illustrated Dictionary of British Churches - Herringbone Definition

History and Architecture

Herringbone

A form of stonework common in the Saxon and early Norman periods, where alternating courses of stones are laid on opposing diagonal angles (for example, one course leans to the left, the next course leans to the right). The resulting stones were said to resemble fish bones, hence the name. Herringbone stonework is often found in the exterior walls of late Saxon churches.

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